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Plato
July 21st 03, 04:59 PM
I'm looking for some sort of document that lists features that one
might expect to "lose" if they choose a pure IP VoIP solution (e.g.
Cisco or 3Com) over an IP-enabled PBX solution (e.g. Avaya, Nortel,
etc.)

Has anyone come across such a listing?

Thanks in advance!

Plato
July 21st 03, 09:23 PM
that doesn't come close to answering my question.

On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 02:39:20 -0400, Jeremy McNamara >
wrote:

>Save your money, don't pay crazy licensing fees. Look into the Asterisk
>PBX. http://www.asterisk.org/
>
>Then pay a geek to make it do exactly what you want to do, if it doesn't
>do it already.
>
>
>Jeremy McNamara
>
>
>
>Plato wrote:
>> I'm looking for some sort of document that lists features that one
>> might expect to "lose" if they choose a pure IP VoIP solution (e.g.
>> Cisco or 3Com) over an IP-enabled PBX solution (e.g. Avaya, Nortel,
>> etc.)
>>
>> Has anyone come across such a listing?
>>
>> Thanks in advance!
>

shope
July 21st 03, 10:30 PM
"Plato" > wrote in message
...
> I'm looking for some sort of document that lists features that one
> might expect to "lose" if they choose a pure IP VoIP solution (e.g.
> Cisco or 3Com) over an IP-enabled PBX solution (e.g. Avaya, Nortel,
> etc.)

IP Voip is not the same as a PBX - you need the extra features provided by
what Cisco and 3Com among others call IP Telephony.

This uses Voip as a way to provide calls in progress, but servers to handle
addressing, dial plans and so on.

I dont think there is such a distinction any more between the old and new
(if there ever really was one) - the latest respin of old PBXes in IP
telephony form takes them to close to the "new world" stuff in both features
and structure.

Its more a matter of specific products rather than industry sector ie. where
the product came from.
>
> Has anyone come across such a listing?
>
> Thanks in advance!
--
Regards

Stephen Hope - remove xx from email to reply

Jeremy McNamara
July 22nd 03, 08:39 AM
Save your money, don't pay crazy licensing fees. Look into the Asterisk
PBX. http://www.asterisk.org/

Then pay a geek to make it do exactly what you want to do, if it doesn't
do it already.


Jeremy McNamara



Plato wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of document that lists features that one
> might expect to "lose" if they choose a pure IP VoIP solution (e.g.
> Cisco or 3Com) over an IP-enabled PBX solution (e.g. Avaya, Nortel,
> etc.)
>
> Has anyone come across such a listing?
>
> Thanks in advance!

Jack
August 5th 03, 01:52 PM
"Plato" > wrote in message
...
> I'm looking for some sort of document that lists features that one
> might expect to "lose" if they choose a pure IP VoIP solution (e.g.
> Cisco or 3Com) over an IP-enabled PBX solution (e.g. Avaya, Nortel,
> etc.)
>
> Has anyone come across such a listing?
>
No, but I did a feature comparison (just from specs) a little while ago and
found the Cisco feature list to be quite short.
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/pcat/clmn.htm
This could just be a fault of the documentation, but the list lacked the
following:
Account codes
Intrusion (Barge-in)
Direct extension select (diversion override)
Hunt groups
ACD
Ring back
Do Not Disturb
DSS/BLF (except for operator)?
Paging
These are just the common features I would expect to see on anything calling
itself a telephone system. Perhaps a Cisco user can confirm whether these
features do exist or have since been added.

I didn't look closely at the 3Com NBX, but it appears to have DND, hunt
groups, paging and account codes.

The Mitel 3300 can be described as "pure IP" although it can include TDM
switching as well. This has a much greater feature list, as you'd expect
from a system inheriting many years of development on conventional systems.
I didn't notice any serious omissions on comparison.

Avaya's IP Office would come into the IP-enabled category. The central
server does not have a long history behind it, but the handsets have been
inherited from other Avaya systems. User features are good - nothing serious
omitted. Voice Mail features are basic, although the system has quite
powerful programming capabilities.

DPGumby
August 8th 03, 05:36 AM
The Mitel 3300ICP has virtually all the features of the SX2000 PBX. The only
big feature the 3300 doesn't at this point have is Tennating ( introduced to
the SX2000 in LW 32). The 3300 does have hot desking though a feaure the
SX2000 could use. Basically the 3300, which can be a pure IP system, doesn't
lack for features compared to a traditional PBX.

DPGumby
August 8th 03, 05:37 AM
I would add that the Cisco also doesn't support QSIG integration to other
PBX's but that's about all I know.

Google